Nutritional Nugget: Manganese

by Melissa Vertosick

A trace mineral

What does manganese do for your body?

  • Required for making collagen (structural part of your skin)
  • Needed for gluconeogenesis- turning digested fats into fuel for your body
  • Part of enzymes that create antioxidant protection in your body It is very difficult to be deficient in manganese if you eat a large amount of plant foods each day. Your body will store this mineral. 

Other minerals affect your absorption of manganese. Iron, calcium, and magnesium all affect how much manganese you absorb. 

Recommended Daily Value is 2mg. 

You can find manganese in:

  • Oats
  • Raspberries
  • Buckwheat
  • Strawberries
  • Cinnamon
  • Kale
  • Summer Squash
  • Turmeric
  • Sea Vegetables
  • Pumpkin Seeds
  • Spinach
  • Pineapple
  • Cranberries

Provided by: Melissa Vertosick, CHHC, AADP

Appointments now open on Tuesday and Wednesday afternoons. Please make appointment at front desk by calling 724.468.3999. Visit the S’eclairer website at www.seclairer.com

 For more diet and lifestyle information, visit thewholelifeapproach.com

Educational Grand Rounds: Bipolar Disorder

by Michael Sorg

New staff member, Sasha Zeleznik, and the students discuss the symptoms to identify bipolar disorder,  what can cause the disease physically, and how you can approach helping the individual to cope and stabilize.  We also discuss the stigma that surrounds bipolar disorder in society and the issues those diagnosed face beyond their internal problem.  

Audio Only

Want an audio version?  Subscribe to our Podcast on iTunesSpreaker, or iHeartRadio

Follow the Educational Grand Rounds Playlist on Youtube

 Want to join us for the live discussion?  Check out our Social Media in the noon hour every Monday as we sit down on Google Hangout OnAir!  Follow us on TwitterFacebook, or Google+ to get updated with the link when we start!  

The following is for educational purposes only.  It is not intended as a substitute for medical or psychological advice, diagnosis, or treatment.  The content should not be used for self-diagnosis, or treatment of any health-related condition.  As always, seek the advice of your health care provider with any questions regarding a medical or mental health condition.  Opinions expressed are the personal opinions and do not represent S’eclairer Behavioral Therapy.

Nutritional Nugget: Lysine

by Melissa Vertosick
lentils.jpg

Feel tired and without appetite?

An essential amino acid, meaning it must be consumed; the body does not produce it.

What does lysine do for your body?

  • Needed to produce carnitine which is involved in converting fatty acids into energy
  • Helps the body absorb calcium
  • Used in forming collagen

Not getting enough lysine can cause symptoms like fatigue, loss of appetite, dizziness, and anemia. 

(http://umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/supplement/lysine)

Add more lysine-rich foods into your diet by eating:

  • Beans
  • Peas
  • Lentils
  • Quinoa
  • Eggs
  • Nuts
  • Spirulina

Best to get from food rather than supplementation.

Provided by: Melissa Vertosick, CHHC, AADP

Appointments now open on Tuesday and Wednesday afternoons. Please make appointment at front desk by calling 724.468.3999. Visit the S’eclairer website at www.seclairer.com

 For more diet and lifestyle information, visit thewholelifeapproach.com

Educational Grand Rounds: Nancy Fitzgerald and "A Course in Miracles"

by Michael Sorg

We talk with Nancy Fitzgerald, currently a facilitator at Teachers of Gods Foundation, joins us from New Hampshire to discuss A Course in Miracles  and how it can change how we can change ourselves from within.  Nancy is a chemical engineer who changed her life work after reading the book. 

Audio Only

Want an audio version?  Subscribe to our Podcast on iTunesSpreaker, or iHeartRadio

Follow the Educational Grand Rounds Playlist on Youtube

 Want to join us for the live discussion?  Check out our Social Media in the noon hour every Monday as we sit down on Google Hangout OnAir!  Follow us on TwitterFacebook, or Google+ to get updated with the link when we start!  

The following is for educational purposes only.  It is not intended as a substitute for medical or psychological advice, diagnosis, or treatment.  The content should not be used for self-diagnosis, or treatment of any health-related condition.  As always, seek the advice of your health care provider with any questions regarding a medical or mental health condition.  Opinions expressed are the personal opinions and do not represent S’eclairer Behavioral Therapy.

Reflections on: Ancient Wisdom The Soul of a Healthy Lifestyle

by Ruthann Valentine

On October 25, 2014, S'eclairer staff put on an event at the St Vincent Campus in Latrobe, PA.  The following are thoughts on the event from staff and students attending.  

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Reflection by Ruthann Valentine, PhD, APRN

Both Safdar I Chaudhary, MD and Athanasius Cherry, OSB, MSN, CRNP enriched our soul with the ancient wisdom from an Islamic physician, Avicenna and Saint Hildegaard Von Bigen, a Catholic Benedictine nun. Both of these Ancient Wisdom Keepers emphasized a holistic approach to health, that is unity and balance of the human body, mind, and soul. Deborah Stiffler, who has studied herbs and their health benefits for over 30 years, presented the healing qualities of everyday herbs, like parsley and dill, that Hildegaard used as medicine. Zahida Chaudhary, MD gracefully facilitated a movement exercise for a natural flow of inner energy.

Collectively, a healing and joyful environment was created. This retreat affirms that we are creating modern lifestyle medicine on the building blocks of Hildegaard's and Avicenna's ancient holistic medicine.

Some of our students attended and give their thoughts:

What I found interesting about the retreat was the historical aspect of medicine and how history is beginning to repeat itself in modern medicine.  We learned about Hildegard von Bingen who was a saint in the German Rhineland back in the 1100s.  Hildegard used various herbs such as spelt flower, chamomile, and pepper to aide in the treatment of sick people.  She also realized health benefits of many foods including almonds as well as the importance of hydration.  Although in our time we like to credit ourselves with discovering healthy facts such as these, people have known them for hundreds if not thousands of years.  I find it interesting that they are making a comeback in modern medical practice and am excited to see how their use for treating diseases impacts the medical field.

~ David Zimcosky PA-S 


After lunch, Dr. Chaudhary talked about the conference his wife and him went on to New Mexico to learn more about the use of botanicals in treating acute and chronic diseases. He talked about how informative the conference was and how now at the gift shop in Zharmony there will be botanicals offered as another treatment methods for the patients at S’eclairer. Furthermore, he talked about an ancient philosopher, physician and scientist Ibni Sina (Avicenna). We learned that he was a genius by the fact that he memorized the Quran by age 10 and was given full status of a qualified physician at the age of 18. Ibni Sina wrote around 450 works, 240 of those survived, most of them are about philosophy, but he wrote a lot about medicine as well. We also learned that his teaching, writing and knowledge he obtain in the 57 years he was alive are still used today throughout medicine. Dr. Chaudhary also talked about Islamic religion and about the way in which Arabic script is written. 

    Throughout this part of the retreat is was very interesting to learn about Ibni Sina and how someone who lived almost a thousand years ago is still shaping the way medicine is practiced today. It was also apparent that learning about the Islamic religion and scripture was something everyone deemed as very thought provoking. The patterns of Islamic faith, many noted, could be seen in the religions that those at the retreat practiced. It was also apparent, both from Dr. Chaudhary and the persons at the retreat that religion and spirituality is something that is very important in their everyday life. 

    The retreat ended with a dance lead by Dr. Zahida Chaudhary, which everyone seemed to enjoy. It was a nice break way to end the day that consisted of sitting and learning new ways of thinking about treatment, spirituality and medicine. 

~ Erin Fitzpatrick


After attending the retreat, Ancient Wisdom The Soul of a Healthy Lifestyle, I have learned many new things in regards to living a mindful, natural and healthy lifestyle. One of the main topics of discussion was botanicals and their use in today’s world of medicine. An increasing number of people are seeking out alternative and more natural treatments for various health conditions.  For this reason, botanicals have been extensively studied and researched in regards to treating specific ailments. Botanicals are simply plant based compounds possessing many healing properties. Patients are often seeking out botanical treatments as they no longer want to consume artificially made medications when natural alternatives are available. A few specific botanicals discussed were chamomile, sage, mint, cinnamon, dandelion, psyllium. After reviewing these among other botanicals, it became apparent how many different healing properties these substances possess. I found it to be enlightening and interesting that a natural plant has the same healing properties as the artificial medications I would normally consume. I feel it is important to be knowledgeable in this area of medicine as a provider so you are able to offer patients alternatives to traditional medicine. However, it is essential for people to remember to always consult a health care professional prior to initiating treatment with botanicals.  As discussed at the retreat, not all botanicals are produced the same way. For this reason, it is important to first discuss these options with your provider to avoid any potential side effects or drug interactions. I feel that everyone who attended the retreat voiced their interest in botanical treatment and definitely gained knowledge in this subject area. 

~ Lauren Aretz, PA Student


Nutritional Nugget: Curcumin

by Melissa Vertosick
tumeric.jpg

The volatile oil that provides the yellow pigment in turmeric.

What does curcumin do for your body?

  • Anti-inflammatory protection
  • Antioxidant protection
  • Protects your liver from toxins
  • Can help improve protein digestion

Curcumin can be consumed in food, drinks, or as a supplement.

Add more curcumin-rich foods into your diet by eating Turmeric

Provided by: Melissa Vertosick, CHHC, AADP

Appointments now open on Tuesday and Wednesday afternoons. Please make appointment at front desk by calling 724.468.3999. Visit the S’eclairer website at www.seclairer.com

 For more diet and lifestyle information, visit thewholelifeapproach.com